Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction - MBSR Course

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Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction - MBSR Course

Date & Time Location Registration
2/18/2020 - 5:00 PM Iowa Methodist Medical Center (1200 Pleasant St), Education and Resource Center, Dorner Conference Room
2/25/2020 - 5:00 PM Iowa Methodist Medical Center (1200 Pleasant St), Education and Resource Center, Dorner Conference Room
3/3/2020 - 5:00 PM Iowa Methodist Medical Center (1200 Pleasant St), Education and Resource Center, Dorner Conference Room
3/10/2020 - 5:00 PM Iowa Methodist Medical Center (1200 Pleasant St), Education and Resource Center, Dorner Conference Room
3/24/2020 - 5:00 PM Iowa Methodist Medical Center (1200 Pleasant St), Education and Resource Center, Dorner Conference Room
3/28/2020 - 9:00 AM Central Presbyterian Church - 3829 Grand Ave, Des Moines, IA 50312
3/31/2020 - 5:00 PM Iowa Methodist Medical Center (1200 Pleasant St), Education and Resource Center, Dorner Conference Room
4/7/2020 - 5:00 PM Iowa Methodist Medical Center (1200 Pleasant St), Education and Resource Center, Dorner Conference Room

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Information

What: This non-clinical (i.e. not group therapy) course is designed to teach mind-body awareness, recognize and put to use our inner psychological resources to respond to toxic stress, increase stress hardiness, focus, creativity, regulate emotions, and allow a greater sense of self-care and well-being.

Who:  Cancer Patients, Survivors, and Caregivers

When: Tuesday February 4: 5:00- 6:30 PM (the opening class will serve as orientation)

             Every Tuesday starting February 11- April 7: 5:00-7:30 PM (Skip March 17) 

     Saturday March 28: 9:00 AM-3:00 PM

**All sessions are Required

Where: Iowa Methodist Medical Center (1200 Pleasant St), Education and Research Center, Dorner Conference Room. (From the parking ramp, take the southeast elevators to Level 1)

Saturday retreat is at Central Presbyterian Church (3829 Grand Avenue, Des Moines)

Cost: $100 deposit refunded after completion of course (scholarships may be available)

Register by calling 515-241-8505. Registration is required and space is limited.

About the course:

Allison Peet, BA, RYT200 is a qualified MBSR™ (Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction) Instructor trained at the UMass Center for Mindfulness where MBSR™ was created by Jon Kabat-Zinn, PhD, and the Mindfulness Center at Brown University. Both schools are the gold standard for exceptional mindfulness training. She's taught since 2016 and has nearly 120 graduates of the course that have reduced perceived toxic stress levels an average of 37%. She is trained through Mindful Schools and teaches mindfulness to youth, K-12 and is a registered yoga instructor. She’s completed multiple week-long silent meditation retreats and has a daily practice. Allison has a personal path of living and working with chronic stress and anxiety which is why she started her own business in 2015, From Within Wellness, LLC, to benefit others. She is committed to creating a more mindful community by helping people develop pragmatic life skills in attentional strength, present moment awareness, self-compassion, and stress resiliency.  

Here is a testimonial from one of my graduates:

"I am a multiple myeloma patient. Multiple myeloma is a blood cancer that affects the bone marrow. Living with cancer is never easy. MBSR provides tools to cope with the new reality of life with cancer. MBSR helped me establish a personal practice of mindfulness, meditation and yoga to deal with the cancer and its treatment. The mindfulness and meditation helped reduce the anxiety and pain associated with cancer. The gentle yoga helped me restore my body from the side effects of treatment."  - B.K. (Summer 2019 graduate)

"Mindfulness Based Stress Reduction training was invaluable to me as I was finishing up my cancer treatment.  I wish that I had taken the class earlier in my journey—it helped me to remain calm during the actual therapy, and it improved my well-being overall in handling the worry about potential future recurrences.  Allison introduced different techniques so we were able to choose methods that were most comfortable and natural for us. Cancer is currently in my rearview mirror, but I continue to use MBSR, and when I do, the quality of my day improves and stress seems to decrease and become much more manageable."    - L.H. Summer 2018 MBSR graduate

Another one who is not a cancer patient/survivor:

“I took the MBSR 8-week course with Allison and it really was a life changing experience. Since taking the course, I’ve been able to get off my anxiety medication as well as sleep medication. Allison is a wonderful teacher/guide and I would highly recommend her course to anyone struggling with coping with stress and anxiety.” – I.S. (Spring 2018 graduate)

Some research snippets:

Mindfulness Reduces Stress (2010)
A study conducted by Britta Holzel at Massachusetts General Hospital, and published in Social Cognitive and Affective Neroscience, finds that mindfulness-based stress reduction can lead to structural changes in the amygdala, a brain structure that plays a crucial role in stress responses.” Vol. 5, Issue 1: Pg 11-17

Mindfulness May Keep Brains Young (2009)
“A study by Dr. Eileen Luders at UCLA School of Medicine, published in Neurolmage, shows that long-term mindfulness practitioners have greater brain volume, stronger neural connections, and less atrophy than non-practitioners. This suggests mindfulness may keep brains young and even help prevent dementia.” Vol 45, Issue 3, Apil 15, 2009: Pg 672-678