The Legacy of Christopher Allsup Gas Can Exchange Event

Exchange Your Old Gas Can for a New Safety Can

Safe Kids Greater Des Moines, Blank Children's Hospital and Metro Waste Authority are proud to support the 4th Annual Legacy of Christopher Allsup Gas Can Exchange event. People attending the event can exchange an old gasoline storage container for a new metal safety can equipped with a flame arrestor. The Bondurant Fire Department will also be on-site to provide practical advice and education on fire safety.

Gas Can Exchange Highlights:

  • Saturday, June 3, 2017  from  8 a.m. to 10:00 a.m.
    Metro Hazardous Waste Drop-Off
    1105 Prairie Drive SW
    Bondurant, IA
  • Equal exchange of one gas storage can (any size) for one new Eagle Manufacturing metal safety can with flame arrestor
  • Old gas cans will be accepted empty or full (gas cannot be transferred)
  • New gas can supplies are limited and will be distributed on a first-come, first-served basis
  • One exchange per vehicle
  • Cans are non-transferrable and cannot be exchanged for cash value
  • Participants must sign a responsibility agreement

About Christopher

Christopher was a vibrant, energetic and happy young man who had a smile on his face every day. He liked school and playing tag at recess. On September 21, 2013, 10-year-old Christopher Allsup suffered burns over 90 percent of his body when a plastic gas container exploded, showered him with gasoline and then ignited. Christopher died from his injuries five hours later.

Legacy of Christopher Allsup Gas Can Exchange Program

Christopher's family wants to educate the public regarding the dangers of portable gas containers. Flammable gas vapor (fumes) can travel out of gas containers; containers not equipped with flame arrestors can explode from a single spark. Under the right conditions, it only takes a few millimeters of gasoline to create a violent gas can explosion. Also, parents need to store gas containers safely in a locked location so children cannot gain access. Representatives from Blank Children's Hospital and Metro Waste Authority will be on hand at the event to answer questions.

What You Can Do:

Always use a proper gas container. An ideal container meats industry standards and has a flame arrestor. A flame arrestor is a small screen that is designed to stop combustion by extinguishing a flame or preventing it from traveling into a gas container.

  • Never store gasoline in a cup or soda bottle as it can easily be confused as a beverage, leading to accidental poisoning.
  • If your gas can is not safe, properly dispose of it in accordance with state laws.
  • Keep gas out of reach of children and store it in a well-ventilated area outside your vehicle and living space.
  • Keep gas away from any type of heat source. Common household appliances, such as a clothes dryer or water heater, can ignite vapors.
  • Talk to children about gasoline safety.