Diabetes Mellitus | Blank Children's Endocrinology Clinic

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Des Moines, Iowa 50320

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Urbandale, Iowa 50322

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Blank Children's Hospital

Diabetes Mellitus

There are two types of Diabetes Mellitus: Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM). Both of these conditions are treated in the Blank Children’s Endocrinology Clinic. 

Type 1 Diabetes Mellitus (T1DM) is a chronic condition that requires lifelong treatment. It is caused by the pancreas not being able to produce insulin. There is nothing that can be done to prevent it. Insulin is a hormone in the body that decreases the blood sugar and allow the body to use the sugar as energy. If the body does not have enough insulin, sugar begins to increase and can become very high in the blood. If untreated, excess sugar can cause damage to the body. Children with T1DM require daily insulin dosing to help the body use the sugar as a source of energy. 

Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) is a condition in which the body does not properly use the insulin it makes. This makes it hard for the body to use the sugar for energy and growth. If the body cannot use insulin, the blood sugars begin to increase. Just like T1DM, if untreated, excess sugar can cause damage to the body. T2DM can be prevented or delayed for some individuals by making healthy lifestyle changes. These include eating a healthy diet, and exercising to maintain a healthy weight. This will help decrease insulin levels in the body and help the body use insulin appropriately. This helps the body use the sugar as energy. 

To diagnose diabetes, we will draw labs to measure your blood sugar and insulin. Symptoms that you may see at home include: increased drinking, increased urination (waking a child up at night or abnormal bed wetting), and increased hunger. A child may complain of stomach pain or may begin to lose weight. If you have concerns that your child may have diabetes, talk to your child’s primary care provider. 

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